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Here are the twenty-first and twenty-second batches of Minimal!Pride and Prejudice! : Appearance of Goodness and Summer Travels . 73 icons total.

Preview:







21. Appearance of Goodness

669. 670. 671. 672.

673. 674. 675. 676.

677. 678. 679. 680.

681. 682. 683. 684.

685. 686. 687. 688.

689. 690. 691. 692.

693. 694. 695. 696.

697. 698. 699. 700.

701. 702. 703. 704.

705. 706.






22. Summer Travels

707. 708. 709. 710.

711. 712. 713. 714.

715. 716. 717. 718.

719. 720. 721. 722.

723. 724. 725. 726.

727. 728. 729. 730.

731. 732. 733. 734.

735. 736. 737. 738.

739. 740. 741. 742.



For P&P batches 1-20, as well as other icons from both stock and from various fandoms-please visit my icon journal—sweet__tea! (MO)

-Textless icons are NOT bases.
-Please Comment and Credit (either emiv or sweet__tea)
-Please do not hotlink!

Comments

( 14 comments — Leave a comment )
zed_pm
Nov. 20th, 2007 11:00 pm (UTC)
Wonderful! I snagged 717 and 727. Thank you!
emiv
Nov. 21st, 2007 12:15 am (UTC)
Thank you! Glad you liked these!
cantiga
Nov. 20th, 2007 11:20 pm (UTC)
Ah, thank you for these, I watched this version of P&P for the first time the other day and I loved it!

I'm taking a few - will credit when used :)

Thank you!
xx
emiv
Nov. 21st, 2007 12:15 am (UTC)
Ah, I simply adore this version (In my mind, no other will do.)!

I am very glad you found some you liked, and thank you!
stephstar
Nov. 21st, 2007 12:32 pm (UTC)
I'm taking a whole heap, they're all so pretty! thanks!
adamwolf
Nov. 21st, 2007 01:50 pm (UTC)
Took 694, 704, 710, 719, 720, 721, 724 and 732. I really like your cropping.
candlesdancing
Nov. 21st, 2007 02:56 pm (UTC)
I'm not taking any, but I just wanted to tell you that these are great - I love this version of P&P a lot and your icons really do it justice :D
xshilox
Dec. 3rd, 2007 05:23 pm (UTC)
I am very much in love with number 710, taking and will credit.
arriterre
Dec. 5th, 2007 11:02 pm (UTC)
Why do people, when featuring characters' faces, always seem to crop most or half or a quarter of them out? I don't understand it.
emiv
Dec. 6th, 2007 12:31 am (UTC)
Cropping, like coloring, subject and style, is subjective. For me, it is often used highlight a certain feature of the face, or find a unique perspective on what would be a rather plain image otherwise:

//

I find the more extreme crop on the right to be more visually appealing than the very centered crop on the left. This is only my opinion, of course—some may agree with it, others may not.

I will admit that I tend to be somewhat extreme with my crops, but it is the style that I personally prefer. In the end, it completely depends on individual perspective.
arriterre
Dec. 6th, 2007 10:00 pm (UTC)
Of course these things are always subjective, and I don't want to condemn anyone's perspective as wrong. In fact, I've been wanting to discuss this with someone who seems able for a while. The last person I asked this about seemed to feel attacked and wasted time defending themselves and telling me I was a nasty person because I happened to disagree with their point of view.

I don't see any image that straightforwardly captures the unique moment of expression of a wonderful character like Elizabeth as plain. Whereas I find with the image on the right frustrating, because I don't as readily identify it as her and can't see the look on her face as well. This might be my feeling as a writer, who is primarily interested in character and dynamic of situation.

My icons, for instance, all match up to this. They all capture characters' expressions, moods and characters rather than trying to be, say, artistic or visually appealing -- though I see them as visually appealing, of course!

What's more, some of them - namely the Keith Moon icon, David Bowie icon, Keith Richards icon, and Mick Jagger icon were made by, ah, "professionals", and you can see the difference. They attempt more of a balance between the subject and the composition and colour.

But I'm getting off-topic. I find it really interesting to discuss icons.

My icon here is of Marianne Dashwood. I think it's a stunning picture, and would be ruined by an off-center crop - do you agree for this particular case, or would you try one nonetheless?
emiv
Dec. 7th, 2007 12:53 am (UTC)
Of course these things are always subjective, and I don't want to condemn anyone's perspective as wrong.

Of course not! And I can see where you are coming from; it is only logical to want to see the whole face of a subject. Unfortunately, full-face centered crops can become, IMO, a bit repetitive and boring when done over hundreds of icons. (Especially when off-center crops afford the opportunity for more unique perspectives.)

(In fact, I've been wanting to discuss this with someone who seems able for a while. The last person I asked this about seemed to feel attacked and wasted time defending themselves and telling me I was a nasty person because I happened to disagree with their point of view.)

I will admit that, at first read-through, I was momentarily defensive, but after rereading your comment, I realized that you were asking an honest question. At any rate, I thoroughly enjoy discussions, especially about icons. With that in mind, please forgive me in advance for the numerous icon examples and long-windedness.

(I don't see any image that straightforwardly captures the unique moment of expression of a wonderful character like Elizabeth as plain. Whereas I find with the image on the right frustrating, because I don't as readily identify it as her and can't see the look on her face as well. This might be my feeling as a writer, who is primarily interested in character and dynamic of situation.)

I can understand this, actually, especially being a writer myself (though it has be a long time since I’ve been inspired in that regard). What caught my eye in that image was the beauty of the hair, face and neckline rather than her expression (which is, in that image, is not particularly unique). Now, in the image a few moments after, the expression is far more intriguing, and I tried to capture it over other aspects of the image:

//

When I am cropping an image and I do not have a predetermined aspect I want to focus on, I generally look for where my eye is drawn and attempt to draw the focus to that point.
Ok, that was somewhat vague. Here are some examples from one of my previous sets.

1. // 2.

In #1, when I was cropping the image, I wanted to focus on what was actually going on in the scene—Elizabeth’s sudden movement and the tension between the two especially.

In #2, I wanted to focus more on the beauty of the scene—the costume, the hair, and the overall softness of the image.

In the context of writing, you could think of one as fleshing out the characters/plot and the other as describing the scene.

(My icon here is of Marianne Dashwood. I think it's a stunning picture, and would be ruined by an off-center crop - do you agree for this particular case, or would you try one nonetheless?)

Oh, I completely agree—it is quite lovely as it is. (To be honest, I had admired that icon when you used it earlier, I even checked out your user icons to see who it was made by, but alas.) But that does not mean I wouldn’t try a different crop if given the original image. :) It all depends on the original image. I tend to get extreme with my cropping when the original image is relatively close-up (like a close up of a face).

Extreme or awkward crops aren’t just for beauty shots, of course. They can, IMO, enhance the expression and emotion of an image.

1. // 2.

#1 is the original icon and #2 is a centered crop version for this example. I feel that the emotion is enhanced by the crop in #1, not lessened by it.

(Continued in the next comment, because LJ felt my full comment was too large.)
emiv
Dec. 7th, 2007 12:54 am (UTC)
In my defense, not all of my icons are the victims of extreme cropping choices. Although it might not be illustrated by this particular set, I certainly use centered crops about as often as I use off-centered ones. (of course, I make an awful lot of icons in general, so it all tends to even out.) Centered examples:

// // //

To use another writing analogy, choosing one style of cropping over another is like using choosing first-person over third-person POV. Some times the subject matter calls for one over the other, and it is the writer’s job to decide which point-of-view to write from—it is a stylistic choice. (Not that this is related, but I, for one, am not a fan of first person—unless it is well-written. It drives me nuts otherwise.:)) Perspective is the key.
dasei_boogie
Dec. 21st, 2007 03:27 pm (UTC)
These are all gorgeous! I'm taking a whole bunch and will most definitely credit if/when I use them~<333
( 14 comments — Leave a comment )